Historical Society shows the public how to dig deep about their historic homes

During their Annual Meeting this weekend, the Newburgh Historical Society kicks off a lecture series highlighting the hunt in historical research. The Historical Society receives many research inquiries throughout the year and although the organization is a logical first step, this two part series explores additional research methods and tools as they examine two popular themes this past year – home and water. Continue reading

Back to Our Colonial Roots

In our Mid-Hudson region, we are fortunate that some touchstones of actual 18th century life are still extant. Washington’s Headquarters in downtown Newburgh is one. Knox’s Headquarters and Edmonston House in Vails Gate are two more. The cast blue and gold state historic markers along our roads hint that we had many more sites that told our story as a colonial territory. Continue reading

Historic Nicoll House Available for Tours on Labor Day Weekend

The Historical Society of Newburgh Bay and the Highlands has announced that the privately owned Nicoll House, perhaps the oldest house in New Windsor, will be available for tours on Saturday, September 1st. This will be a rare opportunity to visit this 1730’s farmhouse built along the Moodna Creek on the sight of the first settlement in New Windsor, and which has been carefully maintained over the years by a succession of conscientious homeowners who have appreciated the historic significance of the home. Continue reading

Historical Society afternoon fundraiser Beer, Band & Bounty

Join the Newburgh Brewing Company for an afternoon fundraiser on Sunday August 19. Drink beer, wine, or soda and have some great food for a good cause. Historians and preservationists will be wandering around, admiring the splendid adaptive re-use of the old paper box factory building. The Brewery’s cheerful and experienced staff will serve you, but they are generously donating all tips collected between 1pm and 4pm to benefit the Historical Society. Continue reading

hendrick hudson

Proudly Launching A Newburgh Giant

By Mary McTamaney

One hundred eight years ago this week, ten thousand people gathered along the shore at Newburgh just where the modern boat launch meets the gates to the former Consolidated Iron Works scrap yard. That was the location of the great Marvel Shipyards where vessels of many types were designed and built in the days when Newburgh was a powerful shipbuilding city. Early in the twentieth century, Marvel was creating steamboats of various sizes. The grandest of them all was the 400-foot Hendrick Hudson. On March 31, 1906, the completed hull of the Hendrick Hudson was sent “down the ways” and into the river. Continue reading

The Once-Crowded Waterfront

By Mary McTamaney

Last week, I sighed as I backed into an easy curbside parking place and walked to the Downing Film Center on Front Street to watch the simulcast performance of a great American play, A View From The Bridge by Arthur Miller. Seeking a parking place near the Newburgh waterfront will soon be a challenge again as Spring turns to Summer and more folks come to enjoy the Hudson River. Continue reading

Back Out On The River

By Mary McTamaney

For all those who reminisce about Newburgh’s past: the bustle of its downtown neighborhoods, the friendliness of passersby, the variety of things to do, the beauty of looking out on the river and the joy of riding out on the water, know that all that is back. In this 300th birthday year, the tipping point seems to have come and people are proud again of Newburgh’s many assets. More positive conversations reach my ears than negative ones. Continue reading

Photo Gallery: Algonquin Park walking tour reference photos

Algonquin Park, previously known as Orange Mills, produced Black Powder from 1815 to 1901. The natural water supply provided power for the machinery needed to power the mills. The park provides a look back during this period of powder making and its role in the lives of the people of the community. Join a guided tour on Saturday, June 16th, to learn more about the history of the mill and how it was produced right here within this beautiful environment. Continue reading

Preservation group leads walking tour of Algonquin Park

As an industrial complex for the manufacture of black powder throughout most of the nineteenth century, Orange Mills in Newburgh was designed to withstand destruction by accidental explosion. Workers in the wooded acres along Powder Mill Road carefully combined volatile ingredients that were refined into gunpowder which they packed and shipped around the country. Machinery, powered by the Quassaick Creek that winds through the property, was carefully operated from a slight distance. Wood and copper tools were used to avoid unwanted sparks, and stone structures were built with thick walls intended to redirect explosive forces. Accidents were unavoidable and the mill survived twenty explosions over the course of its operation. Many of those explosions were heard and felt miles away. Now, over a century since it closed, Orange Mills is being reclaimed by nature. Continue reading