Monumental Newburgh: My Thoughts

Monuments, sculptures and public art appear in many towns and villages both large and small. They pay tribute to heroes of war, first responders and historic figures. In some cases they are simply works of art for public enjoyment. In working on various projects for the Newburgh Historic Society we’ve noticed many of these monuments and sculptures in the city and vicinity and thought they would make an interesting presentation. As the project progressed we counted at least two dozen such items and wanted to know more about their origin, who the artists were and where they were made. The results were astonishing.

Holiday Tour of Private and Public Spaces Rarely Open

Visitors to Newburgh's Historic District are awed by its architecture and its views of the Hudson River. For over thirty years, supporters from all over have joined the Newburgh Historical Society in celebrating a treasured architectural history during the annual Candlelight Tour of Homes. The self-guided tour will take place this year on Sunday, December 13, between 12:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. The authentically decorated 1830 Captain David Crawford House, the Society’s headquarters located at 189 Montgomery Street, is the starting place for the Tour. The house tour features a diverse assortment of over a dozen public and private spaces within and beyond the City of Newburgh’s East End Historic District. This includes mansions, estates, structures in the rehabilitation process, new construction, architectural gems and some of Newburgh’s most important landmarks.

Picture Gallery: A Wine Taste of History

More than a dozen historic sites participated in the 2015 Taste of History, a Columbus Day Weekend “food history” trail organized by the Mid-Hudson Historic Destinations. The main idea, which was to develop an event that incorporated a food experience, was loose and welcomed at the Crawford House. Newburgh was once a thriving nineteenth-century port … Continue reading Picture Gallery: A Wine Taste of History

Author Speaks on Newburgh’s Role in Grapes of the Hudson Valley

During the early years of the nineteenth century, the Hudson Valley was the “breadbasket of the United States,” which was one historian’s way of describing the rise of commercial agriculture. A high demand for American foodstuffs by Europe led thousands of farmers to migrate to New York, taking advantage of the fertile land west of the Hudson River and a close proximity to the markets of New York City.

Topic of Historical Society Panel Discussion: Growing Up in Newburgh

According to the Newburgh Historical Society, the topic of growing up in Newburgh has drawn much attention this summer since the opening of a community exhibit on the same theme. On September 20th, a panel made up of Newburgh citizens and exhibit donors will come together to discuss their experiences through the images they contributed, assisting the Society with meeting the exhibit mission of “fostering an appreciation for the past by evoking nostalgia.”

Picture Gallery: History Talk Benefits Historic Cemetery

The Newburgh Historical Society and St. George’s Church have proven through their partnership that not only is the history of Newburgh rich and diverse, but that many will come to experience it. Over 150 members of the public attended two events organized by the historic organizations. Part one of their partnership was the memorable walking tour of St. George’s Cemetery in July. The tour did very well and many showed their support. The second event, which took place on August 2nd, was a talk about the Rev. Dr. John Brown, a man who is credited with reinvigorating St. George’s Church and founding St. George’s Cemetery. He did much more for Newburgh as the 43 who attended learned.

Newburgh Challenges the Hudson Valley to a Game of Croquet

The Hudson Valley tradition of croquet continues on August 16th between 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. with the annual tournament at Newburgh’s beautiful Downing Park. Registration opens at 12:00 p.m. and players are encouraged to come in pairs or be paired upon arrival. The tournament is sponsored by the Newburgh Historical Society, the Newburgh Preservation Association and the Downing Park Planning Committee, who’ve found the event to be a successful way of promoting outdoor recreation, history and preservation. Admission is $5 per player and spectators are welcome. Refreshments will be available to purchase. Money raised will benefit future tournaments. Please call (845) 561-2585 or visit the Historical Society’s website, http://newburghhistoricalsociety.com/, for more information, including directions and parking.

Joint Program by the Newburgh Historical Society and St. George’s Church Continues with History Talk

The second part of the joint program by the Newburgh Historical Society and St. George’s Episcopal Church continues on August 2nd at 3:00 p.m. with a history talk about the Rev. John Brown. During the first part of their partnership, over 100 members of the public toured through the historic St. George’s Cemetery, which was founded by the Rev. Brown in 1838. The talk, “A Man for Our Time: The Rev. Dr. John Brown, D.D.,” will be presented by Madelaine Piel, historian, genealogist and a Rev. Brown descendant.